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Tuesday, November 17, 2020 | History

3 edition of Outcomes of maternal weight gain found in the catalog.

Outcomes of maternal weight gain

Outcomes of maternal weight gain

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Published by Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality in Rockville, MD .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Pregnant women -- Weight gain

  • Edition Notes

    Statementprepared for Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services ; prepared by RTI International-University of North Carolina Evidence-based Practice Center ; investigators, Meera Viswanathan ... [et al.].
    SeriesEvidence report/technology assessment -- no. 168, AHRQ publication -- no. 08-E009
    ContributionsViswanathan, Meera., United States. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality., RTI International-University of North Carolina Evidence-based Practice Center.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRG559 .O98 2008
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 223 p. ;
    Number of Pages223
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24000885M
    ISBN 109781587633560
    LC Control Number2008377840
    OCLC/WorldCa236149794

    Strategies to improve pregnancy outcomes in Canada must include measures that promote healthy weight prior to pregnancy and within recommended weight gain during pregnancy. The Public Health Agency of Canada’s Canadian Perinatal Surveillance System monitors and reports on key indicators of maternal, fetal and infant health. tional weight gain and adverse neonatal outcomes among infants born at term (37 weeks or more). METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of 20, nondiabetic, term, singleton births. We performed univariable and multivariable analyses of the associations between gestational weight gain and neonatal outcomes. We categorized gestational.   Consequences of maternal postpartum depression: A systematic review of maternal and infant outcomes Justine Slomian, Germain Honvo, Patrick Emonts, Jean-Yves Reginster, and Olivier Bruyère Women's Health /Cited by: Although there is a range of recommended weight gain among women with a BMI of 30 kg/m(2) or higher, some studies have suggested that little or no weight gain is actually associated with better outcomes for obese women and her child. Excess pregnancy weight raises the risk of pregnancy-induced hypertension and diabetes, cesarean sections and.


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Outcomes of maternal weight gain Download PDF EPUB FB2

Gestational weight gain is associated with some infant and maternal outcomes. One weight gain recommendation for all women is not supported by the evidence identified in this review.

To understand fully the impact of gestational weight gain on short- and long-term outcomes for women and their offspring will require that researchers use Cited by: Outcomes of Maternal Weight Gain Prepared for: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality U.S.

Department of Health and Human Services Gaither Road Rockville, MD Contract No. Prepared by: RTI International–University of North Carolina Evidence-based Practice Center Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Outcomes of maternal weight gain.

Meera Viswanathan, Anna moderate evidence for age and parity, and weak evidence for race. Regarding outcomes of weight gain within or outside IOM guidelines, moderate to strong evidence suggests an association between weight gain below IOM recommendations and preterm birth, low birthweight, SGA Cited by: Outcomes of maternal weight gain.

evidence on outcomes of gestational weight gain and their confounders and effect modifiers, outcomes of weight gain within or outside the Institute of.

Objective To investigate the association between weekly weight gain, during the second and third trimesters, classified according to the Institute of Medicine (IOM/NRC) recommendations, and maternal and fetal outcomes. Methods Gestational weight gain was evaluated in 2, pregnant women of the Brazilian Study of Gestational Diabetes (Estudo Brasileiro do Diabetes Cited by: Submit your book and we will publish it for free.

Outcomes of Maternal Weight Gain Pdf systematically reviewed proof on outcomes of gestational weight achieve and their confounders and impact modifiers, outcomes of weight achieve inside or outdoors the Institute of Drugs (IOM) tips, dangers and advantages of weight achieve suggestions.

Suggested Citation:"1 Setting the Stage for Revising Pregnancy Weight Guidelines: Conceptual Framework." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council.

Weight Gain During Pregnancy: Reexamining the Guidelines. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: /   a Exact breakdown for exclusion not documented. b The Institute of Medicine guidelines differ from the guidelines.

In the guidelines, the recommended weight gain range was to 18 kg for women with a body mass index (BMI; calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) less than ; to 16 kg for women with a Cited by: Maternal Obesity, Gestational Weight Gain, and Offspring Adiposity: The Exploring Perinatal Outcomes among Children Study Jill L.

Kaar, PhD1, Tessa Crume, PhD2, John T. Brinton, PhD3, Kimberly J. Bischoff, MSHA4, Robert McDuffie, MD5, and Dana Dabelea, MD, PhD2 Objective To determine whether adequate vs excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) attenuated the.

Maternal gestational weight gain is an important predictor of short- and longer-term outcomes of pregnancy (), but the direction of effect differs by outcome.A large number of studies have found that higher maternal gestational weight gains are associated with decreased risk of small-for-gestational-age (SGA) birth, especially among underweight women, but with Cited by: In this context, we revisited the association of maternal pre-pregnancy weight and gestational weight gain with maternal and neonatal outcomes, taking advantage of a large prospective cohort of pregnant women recruited at their first prenatal visit to the perinatal clinic of the University Hospital in Quebec City, by: 1.

Get this from a library. Outcomes of maternal weight gain. [Meera Viswanathan; RTI International-University of North Carolina Evidence-based Practice Center.; United States. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.;]. Some studies used categorical definitions designed to identify high weight gain alone, 67, 71 weight gain across a spectrum of gain, 4, 25, 49, 52, 54, 58, 59, 70, 72, 74, 77 continuous weight gain, 73, 76 rate of weight gain, 61, 78 and weight gain in relation to pregravid weight.

51, 68, 69, This systematic review of outcomes of maternal weight gain, drawn from a report conducted for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), 4 was motivated by several trends in the perinatal field that are of great public health concern.

First, sinceCited by: We investigated the association of outcomes with pre-pregnancy body mass index (ppBMI), Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations about gestational weight gain, and weight gain trajectories during pregnancy.

A prospective cohort of pregnant women was recruited. ppBMI and weight gain at each follow up visit were collected. The outcomes were gestational Cited by: 1. Catherine Takacs Witkop, in Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Endocrinology, Antepartum Care. As mentioned previously, excessive gestational weight gain can have a compounding effect on the already-increased risks for obese women.

In a recent comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis of over million pregnancies in international cohorts. Maternal weight gain between pregnancies is linked to complications and adverse outcomes Date: June 7, Source: PLOS Summary: Weight gain between pregnancies is linked to pregnancy.

Gestational weight gain and pregnancy outcomes Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism ¦ V olume 21 ¦ Issue 4 ¦ July-August acknowledging that they based their recommendations.

Effect of maternal weight on pregnancy outcomes Low or high prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and inadequate or excess gestational weight gain (GWG) are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, such as caesarean section births, preterm births (PTB) and small-for-gestational-age (SGA) and large-for-gestational-age (LGA) births.

COVID update: We know that our patients and their families have questions related to care during this time. Please see Maternity Care and COVID FAQs for the latest updates. We provide complete care to overweight women before, during, and after pregnancy.

We specialize in caring for women who. "To fully understand the effects of maternal weight gain on short- and long-term health outcomes for both women and infants, future studies will need to adopt standard measures and consistent.

Maternal Weight Gain and the Outcome of Pregnancy United States, An analysis of maternal weight gain during pregnancy by demographic characteristics of mothers and its association with birth weight and the risk of fetal death.

Data From the National Vial Statistics System Ser No. 44 \. maternal weight gain during pregnancy. Specify gestational nutrient needs and nutrition-related concerns. Identify counseling recommendations for common pregnancy-related problems such as nausea, edema, heartburn, hemorrhoids and constipation.

Identify the risks and counseling recommendations for use of caffeine. Association of Gestational Weight Gain With Maternal and Infant Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Goldstein RF, Abell SK, Ranasinha S, Misso M, Boyle JA, Black MH, Li N, Hu G, Corrado F, Rode L, Kim YJ, Haugen M, Song WO, Cited by: 1.

Background: Growing evidence suggests that interpregnancy weight change (IPWC) is a risk factor for perinatal outcomes, since it may increase the probability of gestational complications including gestational diabetes or cesarean onally, IPWC may affect neonatal outcomes increasing the prevalence of newborns small for gestational age or preterm birth.

Abstract. The incidence of obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m 2) at the start of pregnancy has been rising gh maternal diabetes and gestational weight gain constitute confounding factors, many studies report the independent effect of maternal obesity on fetal and neonatal complications, but also on the risk of childhood obesity and adverse cardio-metabolic Author: Delphine Mitanchez, Pascale Chavatte-Palmer.

Maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) represent modifiable behavioral factors that may influence the development of offspring body composition later in life; however, there are relatively few studies Author: Andrea L.

Deierlein. The book has 17 chapters presented in five parts, each devoted to an individual anthropometric indicator. These include weight gain in pregnancy, prepregnancy weight, height, arm circumference, and weight-for-height and body mass index.

Durnwald CP, Ehrenberg HM, Mercer BM () The impact of maternal obesity and weight gain on vaginal birth after cesarean section success. Am J Obstet Gynecol Juhasz G, Gyamfi C, Gyamfi P, Tocce K, Stone JL () Effect of body mass index and excessive weight gain on success of vaginal birth after cesarean : Pai-Jong Stacy Tsai, Nicole E Marshall.

Giving birth to a low-birth-weight infant. Rationale: Inadequate weight gain during pregnancy is associated with a higher risk of giving birth to a low-birth-weight infant.

Gestational hypertension and placenta previa are not related to inadequate weight gain, and congenital malformations are associated with a high maternal weight. Impact of gestational weight gain on maternal and fetal outcomes Weight gain during pregnancy that was greater or less than guideline recommendations was associated with a higher risk of adverse outcomes for mothers and infants, compared with weight gain within recommended levels, according to a study according published in JAMA.

The primary outcome is infant birth weight >4 kg. Secondary outcomes will include adverse infant and maternal outcomes, maternal weight change, maternal diet and physical activity changes, maternal quality of life and emotional well-being, fetal growth and Cited by: 6.

Association of Gestational Weight Gain With Maternal and Infant Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Gestational weight gain and the risk of infant mortality amongst women with normal prepregnancy BMI: the Friedmann-Balayla model. Previous. All. weight gain (GWG) and pregnancy outcomes (i.e., maternal outcomes and neonatal, infant and child outcomes).

The document reports on findings from a review of the literature on maternal obesity, excessive gestational weight gain and pregnancy outcomes, conducted between December 1, and Ma File Size: KB. This systematic review focuses on outcomes of gestational weight gain, specifically birthweight, fetal growth, and postpartum weight retention, for singleton pregnancies with respect to the Institute of Medicine weight gain recommendations.

A total of 35 studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. There was strong evidence to support associations between. Aizawa, S. () Maternal weight gain and neonatal outcomes. Japanese Journal of Maternal Health, 48, has been cited by the following article: TITLE: Relationship between body mass index and course of pregnancy in women.

AUTHORS: Shizuka Takamagi, Hideaki Yamabe. The opening sections of the report provide full details about the method, the study design, its objectives, and possible limitations to its findings.

The first part of the analysis evaluated the inherent value of maternal weight, height, arm circumference, and body mass index as predictive of specific infant and maternal outcomes. The questions that arise from the study by Goldstein et al include the following: (1) can clinicians change the amount of weight women gain in pregnancy, and (2) could altering weight gain to IOM-recommended amounts during pregnancy improve infant and Cited by: 6.

Abstract. Objective To examine the association between gestational weight gain and adverse maternal and infant outcomes among overweight women [body mass index (BMI) – kg/m 2]. Methods A population-based cohort study using birth certificate data (–) f singleton, full-term deliveries to nulliparous, Missouri residents ages Cited by:   Seven studies from 6 cohorts looked at the relationship between restrictive feeding practices and child weight outcomes (7, 9–11, 25, 26, 28).

“Restrictive feeding practices” imply that a parent or caregiver limits the frequency and amount of a child's food by: 7. Adequate maternal weight gain can reduce the risk of poor pregnancy outcomes (Strauss & Dietz, ). The incidence of low birth weight infants and infant mortality decreases with a 21 to 25 pound weight gain and even further declines with a 26 to 35 pound weight gain (Brech, ).focuses on nutrition, weight gain, multiple births, pregnancy diet and pregnancy, including the Top 25 Food All-Stars, optimal bone health, preventing premature birth, and improving outcomes in multiple pregnancy.

Personalized programs are available, based on the award-winning book, When You're Expecting Twins, Triplets, or Quads (HarperCollins, ).INTRODUCTION.

Both maternal prepregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain influence maternal and pediatric outcomes. For example, women who are obese have a heightened risk of many complications in pregnancy, notably gestational diabetes and preeclampsia, and are more likely to have a cesarean delivery.